Where did “newsid” go ? seems mark got the answer


Mark posted a great post about this ancient urban legend, “The Machine SID Duplication Myth”

For the record, just remember that NewSID was never the solution for imaging a computer as a template.
And i’ll quote some of mark’s post and leave you to read the rest on his blog..

On November 3 2009, Sysinternals retired NewSID, a utility that changes a computers machine Security Identifier (machine SID). I wrote NewSID in 1997 (its original name was NTSID) because the only tool available at the time for changing machine SIDs was the Microsoft Sysprep tool, and Sysprep doesn’t support changing the SIDs of computers that have applications installed. A machine SID is a unique identifier generated by Windows Setup that Windows uses as the basis for the SIDs for administrator-defined local accounts and groups. After a user logs on to a system, they are represented by their account and group SIDs with respect to object authorization (permissions checks). If two machines have the same machine SID, then accounts or groups on those systems might have the same SID. It’s therefore obvious that having multiple computers with the same machine SID on a network poses a security risk, right? At least that’s been the conventional wisdom.

….I realize that the news that it’s okay to have duplicate machine SIDs comes as a surprise to many, especially since changing SIDs on imaged systems has been a fundamental principle of image deployment since Windows NT’s inception. This blog post debunks the myth with facts by first describing the machine SID, explaining how Windows uses SIDs, and then showing that – with one exception – Windows never exposes a machine SID outside its computer, proving that it’s okay to have systems with the same machine SID. Note that Sysprep resets other machine-specific state that, if duplicated, can cause problems for certain applications like Windows Server Update Services (WSUS), so MIcrosoft’s support policy will still require cloned systems to be made unique with Sysprep.

http://blogs.technet.com/markrussinovich/archive/2009/11/03/3291024.aspx

Enjoy !

Thanks mark for the clarification.

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About ilantz

I am a technology enthusiastic, I've been working as an IT consultant since late 2007, I attained extensive experience with Microsoft's Exchange Server, Active Directory, Forefront products and the Windows server platform. I love designing solutions, handling security measures, architecture and advanced troubleshooting.
This entry was posted in Misc, Networking, Server 2008 / R2. Bookmark the permalink.

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